Medical Marijuana Summerlin South NV

Looking for the BEST Marijuana Dispensaries in Summerlin South? Welcome to Las Vegas 420 Life, a locally owned and operated Summerlin South Marijuana Directory providing directions, reviews and in-depth editorials on dispensaries and cannabis products. Whether you are new to Summerlin South or visiting, the LV420 Directory is your comprehensive and up to date weed map to help you find the closest cannabis stores and shops. Read the comprehensive reviews of our editorial staff to find the best dispensary for you.

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There are many marijuana dispensaries in Summerlin South , The LV420 Directory is dedicated to providing professional and knowledgeable information to provide the best experience when shopping for cannabis, concentrates, and edibles. Look forward to local medical & recreational marijuana news and cannabis dispensary & product reviews. Our editorial staff will guide you though the cannabis purchase process through the numerous marijuana stores of Summerlin South. Find the closest Medical and Recreational marijuana dispensary in Summerlin South. Map Locator, Dispensary Reviews, & Cannabis Events.

Choosing a Trusted Medical Marijuana Dispensary

The Denver dispensary is called Medicine Man and was founded on serving medical marijuana patients. Yet, since Colorado legalized recreational marijuana sales three years ago, few of the store's patrons have been making medicinal purchases. “There’s less need for medical inventory because we have less medical customers,” said Andy Williams, owner and CEO of Medicine Man, one of Colorado’s largest legal marijuana stores selling both recreational and medical marijuana. “People don’t want to go through the hurdles to get their cards anymore.” A similar scenario will likely play out for Nevada’s pot dispensaries when recreational marijuana sales begin July 1. The first four states to legalize recreational marijuana sales — Oregon, Alaska, Washington and Colorado — have all seen a dip in the number of active medical card-holding patients. For nearly two years since Nevada’s first dispensary opened in July 2015, medical marijuana has been the only source of legal weed. Nearly 28,000 Nevadans currently hold medical cards, and thousands of other purchases come from out-of-state buyers through the state's reciprocity program, which honors medical cards from other weed legal states. Williams’ dispensary opened in December 2009 to serve medical patients, but quickly moved away from that model when recreational sales started in 2014, he said. Medicine Man’s name now seems ironic, given more than two-thirds of its customers are recreational buyers and Williams gets less than half of the medical patients he once did. In Colorado, medical cardholders were down more than 34,000 at the end of 2016 from the program’s peak high of nearly 129,000 patients in June 2011. Other out-of-state dispensary owners have reported a similar decline in medical pot buyers — from Oregon, where state cardholders fell from 78,015 less than two years ago to 67,141 per the state’s most recent tally, to Alaska, where cardholders fell 40.6 percent from January 2015 to the start of this year. “I think more people here have decided not to go the medical route because of the high price tag on getting a card,” said Eli Bilton, CEO of Attis Trading Dispensary in Portland, Oregon. “It’s hard to make up for a $400 annual card if you’re not always buying a lot of product.” While recreational sales have yet to begin in Nevada, the state’s medical cardholder count continues to increase, reaching a record high of 27,952 in April, the last month of data available. But the process of applying for a medical card, similar to those in other states, requires both money and patience. Patients must pay a combined $100 to request and apply for a medical marijuana card from the state, and an additional $100 to $200 to get a required doctor’s recommendation for the card. That card must be renewed every year, for a cost of $75 plus another doctor’s recommendation. Medical buyers are legally allowed up to two-and-a-half ounces of flower purchases every two weeks or the THC equivalent of concentrates, like shatter, wax and carbon dioxide oil, edibles and other ingestible products like tinctures, vapors and suppositories. Recreational buyers in Nevada can buy up to one ounce of flower per day, or one-eighth of an ounce of concentrates, edibles or other ingestible products. That allows them nearly six times as much legal weed in the same 14-day period as medical buyers. And unlike medical cardholders, recreational buyers are not listed in a state registry that also tracks their purchases. That makes it easier to hop from dispensary to dispensary, and even buy more than the legal limit. Nevadans with medical cards are also banned from obtaining a concealed carry weapon permit and those working in certain public sector jobs, like active duty military and most law enforcement agencies, can’t have them either. “There’s just not a lot being done to make medical worth it anymore, in any of the states,” said New York-based marijuana attorney Mitchell Kulick, whose firm is advising state political offices in both Massachusetts and California on implementing new recreational marijuana programs in their previously medical-only states. “The recreational programs have in part swallowed them up, and Nevada may have a similar result.” But with Nevada’s medical pot industry seemingly destined for the same fate as those of other recreational weed states, industry leaders and elected officials are working to throw the industry a lifeline. A state-mandated 15 percent wholesale tax on recreational marijuana sales from cultivation and production facilities to dispensaries, outlined in the voter-approved Ballot Question 2, plus a proposed 10-percent tax proposed by Gov. Brian Sandoval, will allow medical cardholding weed customers to pay up to 20 percent less for the same products at dispensaries, said Andrew Jolley, president of the Nevada Dispensary Association and owner of The+Source Medical Marijuana dispensaries in Las Vegas and Henderson. The savings could add up to hundreds of dollars annually for those who shop at his dispensary multiple times per week, justifying the costs for a state medical card. Armen Yemenidjian, president and CEO of Essence Cannabis Dispensaries, who serves as a panelist with Jolley on Clark County’s Green Ribbon Marijuana Advisory Panel, said he’s also planning on a sizable price difference between his medical and future recreational weed buyers, to incentivize patients to come back. “If you treat everything as recreational, then those patients get lost in the shuffle and there’s no motivation for dispensaries to carry the medical products they’re looking for,” Yemenidjian said. “We’re trying to create a program where there’s big enough cost savings so people are incentivized to keep their card and they’re not seen as second-class customers.” Assembly Bill 422, sponsored by Assemblyman Nelson Araujo, D-Las Vegas, aims to make getting a medical card worth the trouble for less frequent medical marijuana buyers, too. If the bill is signed into law by session’s end next week at the Nevada Legislature, both first-time applicants and renewing cardholders would pay no more than $50 in annual state fees for their card. Doctors’ recommendation notes could also be valid for two years instead of just one under AB422. If passed, the bill would reduce the annual cost for medical cardholders by an average of up to $130 during a four-year period. “There will be some digression available to the medical professionals on whether they want to renew the card amounts for one year or two, but the option will be there,” Araujo explained. “And the card will cost no more than $50 when it’s all said and done. It could cost as low as $35.” Araujo’s bill would also take away the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health’s ability to view information on tracked purchases by medical marijuana cardholders – leaving that information to individual dispensaries. Other regulations associated with medical marijuana, like dispensary licensing and enforcement of violations, would be moved over to the Nevada Department of Taxation to fall under the same regulating body as the new recreational program. “Part of preserving the medical program is ensuring patients have incentive to use it in a way they feel comfortable,” Araujo said. “Medical patients will not be forgotten in Nevada.”

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Nevada marijuana sales permit application period begins

Marijuana is also known as pot, grass and weed but its formal name is actually cannabis. It comes from the leaves and flowers of the plant Cannabis sativa. It is considered an illegal substance in the US and many countries and possession of marijuana is a crime punishable by law. The FDA classifies marijuana as Schedule I, substances which have a very high potential for abuse and have no proven medical use. Over the years several studies claim that some substances found in marijuana have medicinal use, especially in terminal diseases such as cancer and AIDS. This started a fierce debate over the pros and cons of the use of medical marijuana. To settle this debate, the Institute of Medicine published the famous 1999 IOM report entitled Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base. The report was comprehensive but did not give a clear cut yes or no answer. The opposite camps of the medical marijuana issue often cite part of the report in their advocacy arguments. However, although the report clarified many things, it never settled the controversy once and for all.
Let's look at the issues that support why medical marijuana should be legalized.
(1) Marijuana is a naturally occurring herb and has been used from South America to Asia as an herbal medicine for millennia. In this day and age when the all natural and organic are important health buzzwords, a naturally occurring herb like marijuana might be more appealing to and safer for consumers than synthetic drugs.
(2) Marijuana has strong therapeutic potential. Several studies, as summarized in the IOM report, have observed that cannabis can be used as analgesic, e.g. to treat pain. A few studies showed that THC, a marijuana component is effective in treating chronic pain experienced by cancer patients. However, studies on acute pain such as those experienced during surgery and trauma have inconclusive reports. A few studies, also summarized in the IOM report, have demonstrated that some marijuana components have antiemetic properties and are, therefore, effective against nausea and vomiting, which are common side effects of cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Some researchers are convinced that cannabis has some therapeutic potential against neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Specific compounds extracted from marijuana have strong therapeutic potential. Cannobidiol (CBD), a major component of marijuana, has been shown to have antipsychotic, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Other cannabinoids have been shown to prevent high intraocular pressure (IOP), a major risk factor for glaucoma. Drugs that contain active ingredients present in marijuana but have been synthetically produced in the laboratory have been approved by the US FDA. One example is Marinol, an antiemetic agent indicated for nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. Its active ingredient is dronabinol, a synthetic delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
(3) One of the major proponents of medical marijuana is the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), a US-based organization. Many medical professional societies and organizations have expressed their support. As an example, The American College of Physicians, recommended a re-evaluation of the Schedule I classification of marijuana in their 2008 position paper. ACP also expresses its strong support for research into the therapeutic role of marijuana as well as exemption from federal criminal prosecution; civil liability; or professional sanctioning for physicians who prescribe or dispense medical marijuana in accordance with state law. Similarly, protection from criminal or civil penalties for patients who use medical marijuana as permitted under state laws.
(4) Medical marijuana is legally used in many developed countries The argument of if they can do it, why not us? is another strong point. Some countries, including Canada, Belgium, Austria, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Spain, Israel, and Finland have legalized the therapeutic use of marijuana under strict prescription control. Some states in the US are also allowing exemptions.

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