Dear Abby: Medicinal marijuana user is shunned by husband’s family | Lifestyle


DEAR ABBY: My brother-in-law found out I smoke marijuana. I have a medical card and some mental disabilities. Marijuana helps with my anxiety.

Although we live near each other, my in-laws now say they don’t want me in their homes. The stress this has put on my husband is unfair. His brother obviously has a problem with me.

I never discuss marijuana with anyone and don’t carry it around with me. I use it only in the privacy of my home. How should I expect my husband to handle holidays or even regular get-togethers? I really need help.

UNFAIR IN NEVADA

DEAR UNFAIR: Medical and recreational marijuana are legal for adults in the state of Nevada. I wish you had mentioned how your brother-in-law learned you are using it. That it is being used as an excuse to isolate you is cruel.

How your husband chooses to handle further contact — or lack of it — with his relatives will be his personal decision. Not knowing how close they have been, I can’t guess what his next step should be — except to point out that his first loyalty should be to you.

DEAR ABBY: I’m a sophomore in high school, and I need some boy help. I go to a small school, where there are only 60 sophomores, and we’re all pretty close.

There’s this one guy that I kind of like, but I don’t know how to strike up a conversation with him. I know I could ask him for rides to places, since he can drive and I can’t yet.

My problem is I have no classes with him this year, so I can’t do any of the “can you help me with homework” or “did you understand this concept” flirting. He invites me to his parties, but he does that with almost everyone.

I know this is a bit of a random jumble of a letter, but I’m hoping for advice on how to start a conversation, especially because we share no classes.

SMALL SCHOOL PROBLEM

DEAR SMALL SCHOOL PROBLEM: Discuss current events, pop culture or school activities. Tell him about things you like. Because many high school-age boys are interested in sports, find out which ones he’s interested in and ask questions about those. Unless he’s sports-averse, I can almost guarantee it’ll generate conversation.

DEAR ABBY: Today I received the best news ever. My son and his wife are expecting their first child. I am beyond happy for them.

I was so excited, I couldn’t wait to tell my husband. His reaction? “Don’t tell me ‘Cathy’ is pregnant! I hope your son will be able to support it!” “IT” is my future first grandchild — and my husband’s first (step-)grandchild.

My son and his wife do very well financially. He has a great job and is up for a promotion. I always feel like no matter what I say, my husband always has to put a negative spin on it. Or am I overreacting?

HAPPY GRANDMA-TO-BE

DEAR HAPPY: Your husband either has a questionable sense of humor or enjoys putting people down. Surely you knew this before you married him, so rather than dwell on it, choose not to let him rain on your parade.

¢¢¢

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.



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Local pot-infused beauty products that you can try


Nobody said you had to smoke marijuana to enjoy it.

In fact, since Nevada legalized recreational marijuana last year, some of the most popular products are those that you can pamper yourself with. Most of the products don’t get users high, rather they leave you with silky skin, moist lips and physical relief. Reno Magazine talked with Mynt Dispensary about some of the most popular products to spoil your body with on Nevada shelves. 

We found body lotions, oils, balms, bath salts and even chapsticks. Most of the products are infused with CBD oil, a healing compound, and some have a touch of THC, the psychoactive component, if you want an even more enlightened beauty routine.

More: Green gold: A Nevada mining town straddles the Wild West and marijuana culture

More: Ask the RGJ: Is it illegal for pot users to possess a gun in Nevada? Yes

More: The year ahead in pot: The marijuana issues we’re watching in 2018

Note: These products are not FDA approved, as all cannabis products are still illegal on a federal level. Prices of these products may vary at other dispensaries; some CBD-only products are also available online.

1. Avocado Lemongrass face and body cream by Evergreen Organix, Las Vegas 

If you’re looking for a cream that smells as good as it feels, this might be worth trying while you’re soaking your eyes under a set of cucumbers. This cream is dosed at 100 mg THC and 25 mg of CBD per container.

Price: $33 per 2-ounce jar

2.Bath saltsby Dixie, Las Vegas 

You may want to skip the glass of red wine for your next soak because these THC-infused bath salts might actually get to your head a bit since the heat of the bath could activate the psychoactive elements. These salts — also infused with rosemary, cedarwood and lavender oils — are dosed at 100 mg of THC per bottle; a 300 mg THC bottle also is available. Recommended 2-5 ounces of salts dissolved per bath, 15 minutes is the recommended duration of the bath.

Price: $24 per 10-ounce jar

3. Menstrual relief oilsby Evergreen Edibles, Las Vegas 

Sometimes beauty is about making that monthly alarm in your gut shut up. This oil, which contains 100 mg of THC, is meant to provide targeted relief during menstrual cramping, though you should consult a doctor before use. Apply two to three drops of oil to the tip of an unused tampon before insertion.

Price: $22 per 13-gram bottle

4. Sexy time oilby Apothecanna, Colorado 

Sexy time never smelled so good. This is a pricey product, but it might be worth spicing things up in the bedroom. The key ingredients of this floral aroma include jasmine, which acts as an aphrodesiac; coconut oil, which gives a pleasant glide to the product; and argan oil, which stimulates blood flow. Additional CBD oil gives an additional therapeutic element to the massage oil. Use 15 minutes before intimacy. Massage lightly to neck, chest, and other erogenous zones. Reapply as needed. 

Cost: $59 per 1-ounce bottle

5. Body lotionsby CannaHemp, Las Vegas 

If you’re looking for an everyday lotion to keep your hands, elbows and knees fresh and fragrant, CannaHemp’s lotions (which come in Kind Cucumber, Harlot Haze, Free and Cleare and Hyd Rose) have just 40 mg of CBD oil.

Price: $27 per 240-mL bottle 

6. Body balmby Kynd, Sparks

If you’re looking for a step-up from the lotions, you might want to try this locally made body balm that has 174 mg of CBD oil. An additional plus: There’s 17 more essential oils in this fragrant balm.

Price: $39 per 1-ounce jar

7. Breath sprayby Cannabella, Carson City

If you’re sick of breath mints and want to try something new, and something perhaps more potent, try this locally made mint breath spray. Each spray has about .83 mg of CBD oil in it, and no THC, so you won’t be feeling anything.

Price: $31 per 4-ounce bottle

8. Lip balm by CannaHemp, Las Vegas

Everybody needs more lip balm. There are a few brands out there, but try these ones that come in Raspberry Glase, Lemon Risen, Cherried, Blueberry Yum and Lightened Mint.

Price: $9 per tube

 

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Poll: NY voters support legalizing marijuana | Eye on NY


As Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposes funding a study to examine whether the state should legalize marijuana, a new poll found a majority of New York voters support allowing the recreational use of the drug. 

The Siena College poll released Monday found 56 percent of New York voters surveyed support legalizing recreational marijuana. Two-thirds of Democrats and 57 percent of independents are supportive, while 57 percent of Republicans oppose the idea. 

A majority of voters from New York City (60 percent), the downstate suburbs (55 percent) and upstate (52 percent) back legalizing marijuana. 

There is an age disparity in the level of support for recreational marijuana, according to Siena pollster Steve Greenberg. 

“Voters 55 and older are closely divided, while three-quarters of voters under 35 support legalization,” Greenberg said. 

In New York, medical marijuana is legal and strictly regulated. But the recreational use of the drug isn’t permitted. 

Other states have either legalized recreational marijuana. It is legal in Maine and Massachusetts. In the western U.S., recreational use is legal in Alaska, California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. 

In neighboring New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy has called for legalizing recreational marijuana. 

Cuomo hasn’t been supportive when asked in the past about allowing the recreational use of marijuana. But he announced the study, which will be led by the state Department of Health and include the state police, in his 2018-19 executive budget address. 

The study, he said, would focus on the economic and health impacts of legalizing recreational marijuana. 

“This is an important topic, it’s a hotly debated topic … and it’d be nice to have some facts in the middle of the debate once in a while,” Cuomo said in January. 



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Dear Abby: Medical marijuana user is shunned by husband’s family |


Dear Abby: My brother-in-law found out I smoke marijuana. I have a medical card and some mental disabilities. Marijuana helps with my anxiety.

Although we live near each other, my in-laws now say they don’t want me in their homes. The stress this has put on my husband is unfair. His brother obviously has a problem with me.

I never discuss marijuana with anyone and don’t carry it around with me. I use it only in the privacy of my home. How should I expect my husband to handle holidays or even regular get-togethers? I really need help. — Unfair in Nevada

Dear Unfair: Medical and recreational marijuana are legal for adults in the state of Nevada. I wish you had mentioned how your brother-in-law learned you are using it. That it is being used as an excuse to isolate you is cruel.

How your husband chooses to handle further contact — or lack of it — with his relatives will be his personal decision. Not knowing how close they have been, I can’t guess what his next step should be — except to point out that his first loyalty should be to you.

Dear Abby: I’m a sophomore in high school, and I need some boy help. I go to a small school, where there are only 60 sophomores, and we’re all pretty close.

There’s this one guy that I kind of like, but I don’t know how to strike up a conversation with him. I know I could ask him for rides to places, since he can drive and I can’t yet.

My problem is I have no classes with him this year, so I can’t do any of the “can you help me with homework” or “did you understand this concept” flirting. He invites me to his parties, but he does that with almost everyone.

I know this is a bit of a random jumble of a letter, but I’m hoping for advice on how to start a conversation, especially because we share no classes. — Small School Problem

Dear Small School Problem: Discuss current events, pop culture or school activities. Tell him about things you like. Because many high school-age boys are interested in sports, find out which ones he’s interested in and ask questions about those. Unless he’s sports-averse, I can almost guarantee it’ll generate conversation.

Dear Abby: Today I received the best news ever. My son and his wife are expecting their first child. I am beyond happy for them.

I was so excited, I couldn’t wait to tell my husband. His reaction? “Don’t tell me ‘Cathy’ is pregnant! I hope your son will be able to support it!” “IT” is my future first grandchild — and my husband’s first (step-)grandchild.

My son and his wife do very well financially. He has a great job and is up for a promotion. I always feel like no matter what I say, my husband always has to put a negative spin on it. Or am I overreacting? — Happy Grandma-to-be

Dear Happy: Your husband either has a questionable sense of humor or enjoys putting people down. Surely you knew this before you married him, so rather than dwell on it, choose not to let him rain on your parade.

Write to Dear Abby at P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 at dearabby.com.



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Beers talks why best suited for state treasurer | The Laughlin Nevada Times


LAUGHLIN — Bob Beers took the opportunity to talk with the Laughlin Republican Women’s Club Jan. 11 and to let them know that he’s running for state treasurer seat.

Beers handed out his resume and talked about his experiences and why he wants to run for state treasurer. He said he’s a certified public accountant and hopes to bring the integrity of a CPA to the office of treasurer.

“There’s another kind of integrity I plan to bring to this office as well,” Beers said. The integrity he really brings is that of someone who really is what he says he is and doesn’t give lip service, he added.

He’s been tested having been part of the Nevada legislature from 1998-2007, Beers said. He spent five years on the Las Vegas city council. He believes he’s the most qualified to handle cash management, debt management and many other tasks, he continued.

Half of what the office does, he said, isn’t management stuff. It’s more about marketing. The treasurer is charged with marketing various programs the legislature has set up to promote people to save money for children or grandchildren to go to college or some type of technical schools, he added.

Beers said he believes he’s the best person for that type of job because of his education background, having owned and operated his own businesses. It takes a great deal of marketing to have a successful business, he continued.

His resume includes being in radio broadcasting from 1978 to 1985; a CPA apprenticeship with Laventhol and Horwath; owning his own company, Wilson, Beers and Company (a computer accounting systems business); working as vice president of sales and marketing for Payroll Solutions; being a CPA for Seale and Beers and his time as a full time councilman for Las Vegas.

In answering questions, Beers said he divides the world into what he can do or have an impact on and what he can’t. At one point he was being the treasurer for a kick up charter school and that was a cool experience, he added.

Education is one piece he can’t fix, Beers said. He discussed some of the other candidates who are running against him.

He was asked about health care. He said that telemedicine is the closet thing that’s been developed to help with medical services for the rural areas. The problem with health care is that it’s business and there’s not enough money to be made in smaller areas but telemedicine could help some, he continued.

Regarding recreational marijuana, Beers said the key is the banking issue. Because banks are nervous about dealing with dispensaries, they end up with very large amounts of cash and that creates safety issues, he added.

The other problem is there are businesses trying to pay taxes in cash, Beers said. It would be cheaper for the state to hire a armored car service than it would be to address in another way, he continued.

In the bigger picture, Beers said, he compares it to cigars. At the moment marijuana is costly but eventually that cost will come down. It’ll still make big money, but it won’t continue to make as much as it does now, he added.

Beers talked about the state caucuses and how it works. He advocated for club members to be part of the caucus process. He also advocated for members to get out and vote.



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No challenges to marijuana legalization petition signatures materialize


CLOSE

Local officials are beginning to decide if they want medical marijuana businesses in their communities before the state starts giving out licenses next year.
Wochit

 

The push to legalize marijuana for adult recreational use got a boost Friday when a deadline for opposition groups to challenge petition signatures passed and no one stepped up.

Now it will be up to the Secretary of State’s election office to review a 500-signature sample of the 362,102 signatures that were turned in by the Committee to Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol in November, to determine whether there are enough valid signatures from registered voters to qualify for the Nov. 6 general election ballot.

Once that review is complete, the state Board of Canvassers will rule on whether voters will see marijuana legalization on the ballot.

“It’s great news, it shows the opposition must feel that we have a well-worded proposal, but that doesn’t mean we’re taking anything for granted,” said Josh Hovey, spokesman for the pro-legalization group.

 And just because the group may have won this first battle — it must have 252,523 valid petition signatures to get on the ballot — it does not mean it has won the war.

There are still two groups that have formed to formally oppose the ballot proposal: The Committee to Keep Pot out of Neighborhoods and Schools and the Healthy and Productive Michigan Committee.

Neither had asked to challenge the petition signatures by Friday’s 5 p.m. deadline, however.

More: Group seeks Michigan ballot proposal to end gerrymandering

More: Marijuana legalization proposal could add to crowded ballot in November 2018

The first committee is funded by the Michigan Responsibility Council — an organization of businesses that are interested only in medical, not recreational, marijuana. That group is the only contributor so far to the anti-legalization effort with a $5,000 donation, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Secretary of State.

“There are a number of options being looked at” for how the opposition campaign will develop, said Chris DeWitt, spokesman for the committee. “There certainly will be opposition of a robust nature.”

The other group — Healthy and Productive Michigan — is bankrolled so far by the group Smart Approaches to Marijuana, a Virginia-based group opposed to the legalization of marijuana, which has kicked in $150,000 to the campaign.

The group, which was founded in 2013 by former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, D-Rhode Island, and Kevin Sabet, director of the Drug Policy Institute at the University of Florida, has been active in opposing legalization efforts in other states.

Scott Greenlee, spokesman for Healthy and Productive Michigan, said his group kept an eye on the petitions as they were being delivered and figured that the pro-legalization group had gotten enough extra signatures that they would be able to easily qualify for the ballot.

“So now we’re prepared to take our educational campaign to the voters through November,” he said, adding that while the Virginia-based group provided the seed money for the anti-legalization effort, “I have no doubt that there will be a lot of other Michigan-based folks who will step up.”

While millions are expected to be spent on both support and opposition of the proposal if it does make it on the ballot, that level of money hasn’t materialized yet.

The group pushing the ballot proposal spent most of the $651,736 it had raised so far on paying the National Petition Management team, which collected the signatures for the ballot proposal.

And the Committee to Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol is now in debt to the tune of $257,484 owed to consultants, attorneys and fund-raisers.

“We’re focused right now on paying off our campaign debts. But our fund-raising continues to go strong. We have a lot of large and small donors across the state and country,” Hovey said. “Ideally, we’d like to raise $8 million for the campaign, but we’re aiming at between $5 million and $8 million.”

If it makes the November ballot, the proposal would:

  • Levy a 10% excise tax at the retail level as well as the 6% sales tax.
  • Split the tax revenues with 35% going to K-12 education, 35% to roads, 15% to the communities that allow marijuana businesses in their borders and 15% to counties where marijuana businesses are located.
  • Allow communities to decide whether they’ll allow marijuana businesses.
  • Restrict possession of marijuana that a person can carry for recreational purposes to 2½ ounces,  but individuals could keep up to 10 ounces in their homes.
  • Follow the same type of licensing model that is being used for medical marijuana, which will provide for five categories of licenses  — growers, processors, testers, secure transporters and dispensaries.

Voters in eight states — Colorado, California, Alaska, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Washington — and the District of Columbia have legalized the recreational use of marijuana in recent years. Canada has legalized marijuana for recreational use and that market is expected to start up sometime this summer. And Vermont’s Legislature approved legalization last month.

The state of Arizona defeated a marijuana ballot proposal in 2016.

The Board of State Canvassers has three ballot proposal petitions to work through and will do them in the order they were received: repealing the prevailing wage, which requires union-scale wages on public construction jobs; marijuana legalization, and shifting the way district lines are drawn for state and federal offices from the political party in power in the state Legislature to an independent commission.

The Board has not set a timeline for when it will consider the three petitions.

Contact Kathleen Gray: 313-223-4430, kgray99@freepress.com or on Twitter @michpoligal.

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