Legal pot sparks class for Carson High athletes


The Silver State’s vote to legalize recreational marijuana last November has implications for Nevada teens beyond potentially easier access and more temptation.

“We can’t know the long-term effects of legalization, but certainly, the perception of harm is lower with it,” said Hannah McDonald, the incoming director of Partnership Carson City, an organization that sponsors proactive community education on a wide variety of drugs. “Even though marijuana is now legal for Nevadans age 21 and older, the dangers and risks still exist.”

McDonald says Nevada’s marijuana legalization is a perfect jumping-off point to educate teens about its biological and social effects and its legal ramifications for underage use. Rather than interrupting classroom time by adding to an already crowded curriculum at Carson High School, PCC is beginning instruction with students involved in sports.

“We are starting with the CHS athletes because they are all randomly drug-tested per the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association, so we can make these presentations mandatory for them,” she said. “The NIAA imposes consequences if athletes use drugs – basically, the first offense is six weeks off the team. The second offense is a minimum of 90 days and a third offense kicks them out of interscholastic high school athletics altogether.”

Currently, education on a variety of drugs, including legal substances like alcohol and tobacco, is taught only in freshman health classes at CHS, according to PCC Youth Program Coordinator Brooklyn Maw, a CHS graduate and JV girls’ volleyball coach. She and Carson City Sheriff’s Office school resource officers, Jarrod Adams and Dean Williams, recently taught their first drug education class to all the school’s volleyball athletes.

“The class was not just about marijuana, although we are certainly featuring that because of the recent legalization,” Maw said. “We focus on the science of how each substance can specifically affect the developing brains of young adults, as well as their general health.”

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Marijuana, she said, supplies dopamine, sometimes called the “feel good” neurotransmitter, to the brain. Since the human brain isn’t fully developed until around age 25, early and/or chronic users of marijuana can eventually find they no longer experience that pleasure unless they’re using marijuana.

“Another issue we talk about with legalized recreational marijuana is the variety of options available, including edibles,” Maw said. “Smoking it is the quickest way to feel the effect but edibles are slower to absorb into the body, so someone can eat one dose of an edible and then think they need more because they didn’t feel anything right away, resulting in them getting way more of the drug than they should.”

“We had a middle-school student ‘green out,’ which is an overdose caused by taking in too much marijuana too fast,” Adams said. “Although this incident happened while smoking marijuana, there is a greater risk of overdose when it comes to edibles. They are slower to take effect, which may lead people to use too much before the high kicks in.”

Adams also tells the story of a high school girl in Reno who got high several years ago on a Friday night, and the following Monday as she was driving to school, she hit and killed a motorcycle police officer.

“As is routine for an accident like that, her blood was drawn and she tested positive for marijuana,” he said. “This informs the kids that people can remain under the influence for three to four days because the marijuana is still in their blood.”

Adams said the ultimate goal would be to teach the drug education class to middle school students as well as to all the high school students in the hope they would wait until they are legal at age 21 to try marijuana and then do it as informed adults.

“We all have said that sometimes it feels like we are only putting down thumbtacks to stop a steamroller, but educating kids about the science of what happens to their brains and their bodies when they ingest these substances at least takes away their ignorance,” Maw said. “Most of the time, the kids we talk to are surprised to learn of all the effects.”



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Nevada’s early start for marijuana sales has been embarrassing: Opinion


Jim Hartman, Special to the RGJ
Published 11:48 a.m. PT Aug. 31, 2017 | Updated 12:24 p.m. PT Aug. 31, 2017

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For the people of Elko, Nev., vice has always been a fact of life. Now, one long-time illegal vice is suddenly out in the open.
Jenny Kane, Andy Barron/RGJ

Nevada stands alone among the states in an unprecedented rush to “Early Start” recreational marijuana sales that began on July 1. This wild ride to Early Start resulted in national embarrassment with a self-created “pot emergency” being declared on July 6 — just five days later.  

The July 1 Early Start date was unilaterally and arbitrarily announced by Department of Taxation Executive Director Deonne Contine last December. There were no public hearings and there was no vote of approval by the governing Nevada Tax Commission.

In passing Question 2, Nevada voters had been assured recreational sales would begin six months later, on Jan. 1, 2018, after adoption of  permanent regulations.

Hidden from public scrutiny, the Early Start program involved an unholy alliance of medical marijuana licensees and Nevada politicians. Under question 2, medical marijuana licensees were given exclusive rights to sell recreational marijuana. Medical marijuana owners, including Las Vegas Sun publisher Brian Greenspun, made it clear their businesses were unprofitable without recreational marijuana sales. The result was a hastily conceived  “Early Start” program — a state “bail out” of medical marijuana licensees who were losing money. In exchange, state officials imposed a 10% retail marijuana tax that would yield a rosy forecast of  $60 million to $70 million over two years.

On June 20, Early Start was thrown into legal turmoil when an injunction was granted to Nevada liquor wholesalers against the Nevada Tax Commission. Judge James Wilson found the tax commission to have adopted invalid temporary regulations and engaged in improper  “ad hoc rulemaking.” The judge noted that Question 2 provided an “exclusive right” for liquor wholesalers to act as marijuana distributors. The tax commission appealed the case, now pending in the Nevada Supreme Court.  

The Nevada liquor wholesalers’ lawsuit was based on their being denied “exclusive rights” to act as marijuana distributors. Tax Commission Director Contine found there was an insufficient number of liquor wholesalers to serve the market. If that were true, Contine would be allowed to license marijuana companies as distributors. Judge Wilson ruled there to be no basis for Contine’s finding of insufficiency and ordered the tax commission to adopt valid new rules for determining sufficiency.

As a result of Judge Wilson’s decision, a “Statement of Emergency” was endorsed by Gov. Sandoval to allow new expedited regulations to be adopted for marijuana distribution. One newspaper headlined: “Governor declares state of emergency as marijuana stash runs short.” The action was widely lampooned in media across the country. These new regulations were adopted by the tax commission and are now the subject of a second lawsuit for injunctive relief by liquor wholesalers.

With media attention on the supply issue, dispensaries also became attractive magnets for theft of both product and cash. A Las Vegas dispensary reported four burglars stole $50,000 of material from their vault — before July 1.  Almost a dozen other businesses experienced similar break-ins before opening day, according to the Nevada Dispensary Association. One news outlet described the first 13 days of legalization as “total mayhem.” 

Rather than spend inordinate time distracted by who distributes marijuana in Nevada, Tax Commission Director Contine needs to focus on mechanisms that have been proven to work: inventory tracking, product testing, data collection, public health awareness, traffic safety, consumer education and youth prevention.   

Jim Hartman is an attorney residing in Genoa and was president of Nevadans for Responsible Drug Policy in 2016.

 

Read or Share this story: http://www.rgj.com/story/opinion/voices/2017/08/31/nevadas-early-start-marijuana-sales-has-been-embarrassing-opinion/619015001/



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Decriminalization is not effective says cannabis lawyer


The legalization of marijuana has become so mainstream that a segment called “Marijuana Moms” appeared on the “Today Show” earlier this month featuring moms who regularly smoke weed and claim it makes them better parents. But make no mistake, scores of people, particularly poor and of color, have criminal records tainted or still sit in prison because of marijuana.

Mitchell Kulick, founding partner at the New York City law firm Feuerstein Kulick LLP, which advises investors and early stage cannabis companies, talked to Salon’s Amanda Marcotte about the the status of legal marijuana across the country and whether decriminalization works.

Here are some highlights from their conversation. Watch the video for more on the legalization of marijuana.

On the state of legal marijuana in U.S.:

The overall state of legalized marijuana in the United States is fragmented. So, you have at this point in time, about 30 states that have a medical program, sort of a robust medical program. I think it’s probably closer to almost 50 states that have some form, but a real medical program is about 30 states and then there are eight states that have a recreational. I think you just mentioned Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, those are the most recent to have passed a recreational program.

Decriminalization—people confuse the two between legalization and decriminalization. In New York City, marijuana is decriminalized, meaning that if you were caught with possessing a certain small amount, you’re going to get a ticket like a traffic ticket, which is different than legalized, which is your ability to go purchase it at a store or dispensary.

On whether decriminalization is effective:

Definitely, it’s not an effective way, but this seems to be the only way, as far as the United States at this point in time. Certainly, if you look to Canada, our neighbor to the north, what they’ve done is, they’ve legalized it across the entire country for medical, at this point in time, moving towards recreational. That solves a lot of problems when you’re legal across your entire country, in terms of banking, access to capital markets, etc, which are very difficult aspects participating in the industry here in the United States being so fragmented.

It was a western movement, but now it’s going to be, it’s everywhere. Once Massachusetts voted there, which will start July 1, 2018, it puts a lot of pressure on the neighboring states to do the same thing because otherwise all their citizens are going to move across the border and pay their taxes to Massachusetts and not to Connecticut, and Rhode Island, and Vermont. I think it’s going to spread, the East Coast is going to be huge.




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Burning Man 2017 – Nevada festival sees thousands of revellers braving ferocious dust storm for insane Mad-Max style party


MAD Max-like cyberpunks were pictured dancing wildly in a dust storm that tore through Burning Man – one of the world’s biggest and most extreme festivals.

The ghostly figures wore masks or a cloth over their mouths and continued dancing as the howling wind kicked up choking dust in the desert of Nevada.

Reuters

Burning Man participants dance to the music of an art car in the midst of a desert dust storm
 The dust storm that tore through the desert couldn't stop the party

Reuters

The dust storm that tore through the desert couldn’t stop the party
 Pili Montilla basks in the sunshine in a wacky headdress

Reuters

Pili Montilla basks in the sunshine in a wacky headdress
 This dancer donned a mask made from the tips of coloured pencils

Reuters

This dancer donned a mask made from the tips of coloured pencils
 The dance parties were ablaze with colour despite the gloom caused by the dust storm

Reuters

The dance parties were ablaze with colour despite the gloom caused by the dust storm

Other out-there pictures show the colourful and wild outfits and art installations that transform the bleak landscape.

The yearly Burning Man festival sees tens of thousands of people gather for at least a week of mayhem and mutiny.

This year the theme of the event is “Radical Ritual” to honour the rituals that humankind has created over the years.

Revellers from all walks of life — from surreal artists and far-out families to high-flying CEOs and tech titans – enjoy the party every year.

In the past, electric car pioneer Elon Musk, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Google’s Larry Page and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook joined the rebellious souls at Burning Man.

Last year’s festival hosted over 70,000 “burners” including 3,000 rich enough to fly in to its unregulated Black Rock City Airport.

And in the past there’s been a tent for mass lesbian romps, a human petting zoo and first-timers get hugged by a stark naked welcoming committee.

The event began Sunday and continues through this week about 100 miles (161 kilometers) north of Reno.

Thousands of revellers gather in the Nevada desert for the Burning Man festival
 This aerial view shows the incredible scale of the week-long party

Washoe Sheriff / Twitter

This aerial view shows the incredible scale of the week-long party
 An eerie figure cycles through the gloom

Reuters

An eerie figure cycles through the gloom
 Burning Man participant Kai Rey of Sebastopol, California dances alone in the "Field of Fairies" art project

Reuters

Burning Man participant Kai Rey of Sebastopol, California dances alone in the “Field of Fairies” art project
 A shibari rope scene takes place during a driving desert dust storm

Reuters

A shibari rope scene takes place during a driving desert dust storm
 Burning Man participants who go by the 'Playa Names' Coy and Vance cling to the top of a 20 foot high art project pyramid tower called 'The Tower of !Babel'

Reuters

Burning Man participants who go by the ‘Playa Names’ Coy and Vance cling to the top of a 20 foot high art project pyramid tower called ‘The Tower of !Babel’
 The event draws free spirits from around the US and further afield

Reuters

The event draws free spirits from around the US and further afield
 Participants gather in the shade of the art installation Tree of Ténéré

Reuters

Participants gather in the shade of the art installation Tree of Ténéré
 Burning Man participants reach for free bracelets from a man participating in the event's 'gifting culture'

Reuters

Burning Man participants reach for free bracelets from a man participating in the event’s ‘gifting culture’
 The event was named Burning Man because it began as a bonfire ritual on the summer solstice

Reuters

The event was named Burning Man because it began as a bonfire ritual on the summer solstice
 A dancer shows impressive skills as he balances a bottle of champagne

Reuters

A dancer shows impressive skills as he balances a bottle of champagne
 Lauren Rock reacts as she and Bob Peterson of San Francisco are pronounced married

Reuters

Lauren Rock reacts as she and Bob Peterson of San Francisco are pronounced married
 Burning Man participant Lauren Rock (right) throws her bouquet after she married Bob Peterson (left) in front of the 'Mucaro' owl art project

Reuters

Burning Man participant Lauren Rock (right) throws her bouquet after she married Bob Peterson (left) in front of the ‘Mucaro’ owl art project
 A man calling himself Jonny Moderation parties in a military-style cap

Reuters

A man calling himself Jonny Moderation parties in a military-style cap
 These runners did a marathon on the main strip known as the Playa

Reuters

These runners did a marathon on the main strip known as the Playa
 A 'burner' called 'luiS' enjoys some shade

Reuters

A ‘burner’ called ‘luiS’ enjoys some shade
 A parade of people in bright green morph suits draw a crowd

Reuters

A parade of people in bright green morph suits draw a crowd
 An 'alien' poses for the camera as the day draws to a close

Reuters

An ‘alien’ poses for the camera as the day draws to a close
 Chung Huynh of South Dakota wears the helmet that he worked on for three weeks

Reuters

Chung Huynh of South Dakota wears the helmet that he worked on for three weeks
 Participants ride in the playa on a mutant vehicle

Reuters

Participants ride in the playa on a mutant vehicle

The Burning Man Festival was first held by Larry Harvey and his group of friends in 1986.

They named the event Burning Man because it began as a bonfire ritual on the summer solstice on Baker Beach in San Francisco.

 A couple is married under the Tree of Ténéré art installation

Reuters

A couple is married under the Tree of Ténéré art installation
 Participants watch the sunset before the night's revels begin

Reuters

Participants watch the sunset before the night’s revels begin
 Tired revellers lie down after the day's partying in a building known as 'The Temple'

Reuters

Tired revellers lie down after the day’s partying in a building known as ‘The Temple’
 Performers are everywhere you turn at the event, which attracts around 70,000 people

Reuters

Performers are everywhere you turn at the event, which attracts around 70,000 people
 Memorials to loved ones are posted by visitors to The Temple

Reuters

Memorials to loved ones are posted by visitors to The Temple
 Pippa Sutherland (left) and AJ Bertenshaw dance in the twilight

Reuters

Pippa Sutherland (left) and AJ Bertenshaw dance in the twilight
 Participant David Huffman is covered by the swirling dust

Reuters

Participant David Huffman is covered by the swirling dust
 Burning Man participant 'Mama Jax' smiles from the back of 'The Penetrator' art car

Reuters

Burning Man participant ‘Mama Jax’ smiles from the back of ‘The Penetrator’ art car
 enise Winkler of Dresden, Germany offers a remembrance tag to be written on and added to 'The Shrine of Lost Moments'

Reuters

enise Winkler of Dresden, Germany offers a remembrance tag to be written on and added to ‘The Shrine of Lost Moments’
 Heavily modified 'art cars' are a huge part of the entertainment

Reuters

Heavily modified ‘art cars’ are a huge part of the entertainment
 These two Burning Man participants were caught in a driving desert dust and rain storm

Reuters

These two Burning Man participants were caught in a driving desert dust and rain storm
 The effigy of 'The Man', which will be burned at the culmination of Burning Man 2017

Reuters

The effigy of ‘The Man’, which will be burned at the culmination of Burning Man 2017
 Jen Van Schmus plays kickball on the Playa

Reuters

Jen Van Schmus plays kickball on the Playa

Since then, the gathering has been organised by the Burning Man Project and has become an annual event which this year was attended by over 70,000 “burners”.

And for many, it marks the end of summer, the festival is rounded off by living up to its title – with the burning of a giant wooden man-shaped construct

 Burning Man participant Marshall Mosher from Atlanta surfs through the desert dust on a motorised surfboard

Reuters

Burning Man participant Marshall Mosher from Atlanta surfs through the desert dust on a motorised surfboard
 Diggy Shakes lights the art installation Efflorescence as approximately 70,000 people from all over the world gathered for the annual Burning Man arts and music festival

Reuters

Diggy Shakes lights the art installation Efflorescence as approximately 70,000 people from all over the world gathered for the annual Burning Man arts and music festival
 Kylie Webb of Santa Cruz, California spins inside a metal hoop on a roller disco floor

Reuters

Kylie Webb of Santa Cruz, California spins inside a metal hoop on a roller disco floor
 A masked man takes part in a fire ceremony in the desert

Reuters

A masked man takes part in a fire ceremony in the desert
 A reveller dances under the blazing desert sun

Reuters

A reveller dances under the blazing desert sun
 The annual gathering kicks off on the last Sunday of August, and runs until the first Monday of September

Reuters

The annual gathering kicks off on the last Sunday of August, and runs until the first Monday of September
 Two women escort a mutant vehicle on the playa

Reuters

Two women escort a mutant vehicle on the playa
 Burning Man participant Cole Wardley of Salt Lake City plays the Baby Grand piano inside the "Heardt" art project

Reuters

Burning Man participant Cole Wardley of Salt Lake City plays the Baby Grand piano inside the “Heardt” art project

But anyone wanting to spark up a joint at the party should think twice – even though Nevada has legalised recreational marijuana.

“The broader public including those that go to Burning Man seem to think that at Burning Man, anything goes,” said Rebecca Gasca, CEO of the Reno-based cannabis consulting firm Pistil and Stigma.

Voters in the state passed a marijuana legalisation measure in 2016, and sales began at retail stores on July 1.

But consumption is allowed only in private and even possession remains illegal on federal lands, including the stretch of Black Rock Desert managed by the US Bureau of Land Management where the counter-culture festival is.

“You’re not exempt from the law at Burning Man, and that is doubly true this year,” festival spokeswoman Megan Miller told the Reno Gazette-Journal.

BLM officials say a pot possession arrest can result in a year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

But federal agents made no arrests for any crimes last year at Burning Man, or the year before.


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Dirty Cops Las Vegas



Dirty cops in Las Vegas caught on camera doing an illegal raid on a medical marijuana delivery. The first thing you’ll notice is they kicked down the front door and never knocked, showed a warrant or announced that they were law enforcement. As you continue watching the video, you’ll see one of the male cops pointing a gun at one of the male volunteers for no reason and another male police officer searching a female volunteer as he grabs her breasts multiple times.

As the footage continues you can see the cops illegally tampering with the cameras to try and keep their illegal raid from being caught on camera. You can also hear them talking about taking some of the medical edibles for themselves as well as some of medical marijuana. You will also see one of them take a pre-roll and put it in their pocket while another dirty cop can be seen actually lighting a joint as he walks out of the cameras view.

We’ve all heard of dirty cops doing illegal raids and stealing the evidence. But this video will definitely shock you and make you question how these dirty cops are getting away with doing illegal searches and raids without having to worry about any consequences.

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